Why Switch to an Insulin Pump?

Camille-CreditStrotzPhotography-lowresNote: Camille was the inspiration for the development of N-Style ID in 1999. Camille is my daughter and when she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at age 10, we tried to find a medical ID bracelet that would look fashionable instead of institutional. Our search turned up only a few options and none of them were stylish. That is when I started making medical ID jewelry for kids and adults to be proud to wear. I hope you enjoy all of the fashionable medical ID jewelry we provide.    
At 28, Camille says she is feeling the healthiest she has ever been and she is very in tune with her body. Camille has Type 1 Diabetes. About 5 months ago, she decided to try using an insulin pump, and she says it a huge improvement over giving herself shots. €œIt is so much easier to control my blood sugar with the pump,€ said Camille. An insulin pump is a small computerized device that adheres to the skin and injects insulin into the fatty tissue. Insulin is delivered in steady measured doses called the basal rate. When needed, a surge (or bolus) dose can be made€”usually around mealtime. photo of insulin pumpAffixed to her upper thigh, the pump is about the size of a small pad of Post-It Notes. It is not visible until she wears leggings or yoga pants. The model Camille uses has no tubing to kink up or loosen. Although it makes a small clicking sound, she doesn't feel anything when insulin is delivered. In conjunction with the pump, she wears a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) on her arm. It checks blood sugars every five minutes and she can monitor her glucose levels with an app on her phone. With remote control, she can adjust basal rate doses or deliver a bolus dose. She wears the pump and CGM nonstop€”and that includes swimming, showering and in hot tubs. She changes the insulin pod every three days and manually checks blood sugars a few times per day to calibrate the pump. She finds that with this system, she doesn't have to worry so much about whether her blood sugars are fluctuating. €œThe pump gives you a continuous flow of insulin throughout the day, instead of taking a 12- to 24-hour long-lasting insulin,€ said Camille. €œWith the shots, my blood sugars were going up and down throughout the day. With the insulin pump, I feel like I have a lot more energy because my blood sugars are so much more regulated€”and, my A1C is more steady.€ Using the pump may serve more purpose than just creating a more convenient way to administer insulin and monitor blood sugar. A study released in 2014 showed that use of an insulin pump to administer insulin, rather than injecting multiple daily doses of, resulted in a 29% reduction in mortality rate and 43% reduction in the risk of fatal cardiovascular disease.(1) When asked what she would say to other people with Type 1 diabetes who are considering a pump, Camille says, €œIt makes living with Type 1 Diabetes so much easier and manageable."  
  (1)   https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140916182216.htm More information about insulin pumps is available from the American Diabetes Association. Download the American Diabetes Association's 2015 Guide to Insulin Pumps.

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